Subject Information

Subjects Offered

For more details on the subjects offered, please visit the SEAB website on Exam Syllabuses.

General Paper

The General Paper will test the candidate’s understanding of the world they live in (global and local), his maturity of thought and ability to apply critical reading and creative thinking skills; and his use of English in clear, accurate and effective communication. All students are to sit for the General Paper.

H1 China Studies in English (CSE)

H1 China Studies in English (CSE) is an inter-disciplinary subject that aims to promote an awareness of, and interest in, contemporary China. The syllabus focuses on the geopolitical, economic and socio-cultural aspects of China’s development since 1978. CSE helps students appreciate and gain an informed perspective of the China that so often appears in the news. If you wish to study a subject that has enduring relevance to the current political issues and cultural studies of East Asia and the impact a rising China has on the world, CSE is an excellent choice. In addition, you will find CSE an exciting and relevant complement subject to General Paper, History, Economics and the Sciences. Join the CSE programme for a fascinating journey through the historical and contemporary terrains of Chinese society and culture. Knowledge of the Chinese language is not necessary; curiosity however, is a requirement.

Students will offer one paper comprising of one Case Study and one Essay sections. The syllabus will cover four major themes.

China Studies in English Paper 1 (8817/01)
Theme 1: Culture and Society
Theme 2: Authority and Governance
Theme 3: Development and Challenges
Theme 4: China and the World

English Literature

H1: Literature in English (8810)
Scope of subject:
- Skills: informed personal and critical response, skills of literary analysis, maturity of thought

Exam format: 1 paper over 3 hours (3 questions)

Paper 1: Reading Literature
- 2 set texts: Close reading and guided interpretation of concerns/themes and literary techniques used by the writers.
- 1 Comparison of 2 unseen poems: ability to comment on and critically compare poetry and organize informed personal response based on close reading of the 2 pieces demonstrating an ability to relate style to overall effectiveness.

H1 level over 2 years of study: - in-class discussions, written exercises, 1 time-bound mock examination, 4 internal major examinations.

H2 Literature in English (9725)
Scope of subject:
- Skills: informed personal and critical response, skills of literary analysis, maturity of thought

Exam format: 2 papers over 6 hours (3 hours each, 3 questions each)

Compulsory Paper: Reading Literature
- same paper offered by H1 candidates
- refer to H1 outline for details

Elective Paper: Women in Literature - Paper 5
- 3 set texts: Close reading and guided interpretation of concerns/themes and methods raised.
- 1 unseen extract (poetry/prose/drama): ability to do close reading and critical commentary on features of extract that are typical of the set topic of study.

H2 level over 2 years of study: - in-class discussions, written exercises, 1-2 time-bound mock examinations, 4 internal major examinations.

H3 Literature in English (9805)
Scope of subject:
- for students who display exceptional ability and interest in the study of Literature

Exam format: 1 Research Essay on literary topic of student’s choice.

Guidelines: UCLES approval for research topic required; tutors provide some guidance in line with UCLES restrictions.

H3 level over 1+ years of study: - two meetings with a supervising tutor to guide student in the approach and execution of the extended essay.

English Language and Linguistics (9727)

What is ELL?
- An H2 subject that comprises 2 papers: Paper 1 Analysing Language Use; Paper 2 Investigating Language Use in Society
- Each paper has equal weightage.
- Can be offered as a contrasting subject for Science students
- Can be offered together with Literature and Knowledge and Inquiry
- Cannot be offered in lieu of General Paper

What are some of the objectives of ELL?
To develop students’ understanding, use and appreciation of the English language through:
- The discipline of linguistics
- An investigation of the nature of the English language and some contemporary language issues
- Analysis of the contexts in which the English language operates

What will I study?
- Structures and functions of the English language
- The language features of written, spoken and multimodal texts
- How linguistic choices are determined by the audience we are addressing, the purpose of communication and the situation in which we are communicating
- How and why the English language varies
- The role of the English language in society
- The role of varieties of English in Singapore
- English as a world language

What are some examples of the texts that I will study?
Examples of written texts:
- newspaper and magazine articles
- publicityleaflets
- emails
- press releases
- sms/text messaging

Examples of spoken texts:
- Transcriptions of everyday conversations, speeches and interviews
- Music lyrics
- Podcasts

Examples of multimodal texts:
- Print Advertisements
- Blogs
- Websites

How will I be assessed?
Paper 1: Candidates must answer 2 questions in 3 hours
Section A: Systematic analysis of linguistic features of 2 linked texts
Section B: Adaptive writing and commentary

Paper 2: Candidates must answer 3 questions in total; at least 1 question from each section.
Duration of the paper is 3 hours.
Section A: Language Variation and Change (2 questions set linked to material printed on the paper)
Section B: Language, Culture and Identity (2 questions set linked to material printed on the paper)

How do I qualify?
- A distinction in ‘O’ Level English
- A distinction in at least one ‘O’ Level Humanities subject
- Applicants must sit for a qualifying test for selection
- The selection test will be 2 hours long, comprising a grammar test and an argumentative essay 250-300 words in length, to determine applicants’ English proficiency.

What can I look forward to?
• The English Language Elective Scholarship offered by the Ministry of Education: remission of school fees, $1000 allowance per annum (tenable for 2 years subject to satisfactory progress at the end of JC1)
• Special programmes such as work attachment
• Additional teaching facilities such as the English Language Centre

Knowledge and Inquiry

Course Requirements:
A selection test will be conducted to choose interested students for the course. Students are required to be very competent in the English language and they will be required to carry on with a contrasting H1 subject in year one. Certain attributes like a willingness to think hard, a love of reading, and an enquiring mind are expected. As the numbers are expected to be small, active leading and participation in tutorials are also expected.

Description of Knowledge and Inquiry
KI is a challenging H2 subject offered as an alternative to the General Paper. It can be chosen as a contrasting subject in relation to other H2 subjects. It will appeal especially to those who love to read widely and who think of hard and fundamental questions on a whole range of issues. It is the only subject which offers students the opportunity to write a research paper on an area of interest selected by the students themselves. This will be done during the second year of the course.

Paper 1: Essay (60 mks)
1.1 This paper gives candidates the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of and ability to apply the concepts they have learned in their study of the nature and construction of knowledge. It is divided into 2 sections: A and B.

1.2 Section A covers the theoretical aspects of knowledge. The subject revolves around the following key questions:
- Why ask questions?
- What is knowledge?
- How is knowledge constructed?
- What makes knowledge valid?
- How is knowledge affected by society?
- How should knowledge be used?

1.3 Section B covers the several distinct filed of knowledge such as scientific knowledge, aesthetics, the social sciences, historical knowledge, the field of ethics and moral knowledge and other areas. The questions set will draw on applications of the key questions in Section A.

Paper 2: Critical Thinking (60 mks)
2.1 This paper gives candidates the opportunity to demonstrate critical thinking skills by applying their knowledge and understanding of what they have studied to unseen stimulus material. The paper is divided into 2 sections: A and B.

2.2 Section A comprises 1 passage on an area related to the nature and construction of knowledge. The passage is followed by one compulsory question that will require candidates to apply their broader understanding of the nature and construction of knowledge to address specific contexts as required by the question

2.3 Section B will present candidates with a variety of texts that will require them to identify and evaluate assumptions, points of view, and verify claims and finally provide reasoned and supported arguments.

Paper 3: Independent Study (80 mks)
3.1 This paper gives candidates the opportunity to select a topic of their choice, related to an area of the nature and construction of knowledge outlined in the syllabus that they have studied, and carry out independent research on that topic.

3.2 This paper will require candidates to:
- apply their understanding of the nature and construction of knowledge in addressing the specific context of their chosen area of study
- select appropriate material from the content of the syllabus in addressing their chosen area of study
- show that they have engaged in relevant reading during the course of their research by presenting a literature review and applying what they have read to support the arguments they present.

3.3 The selected topic must be focused and suitable for an in-depth study of 6 months’ duration and candidates’ proposals must be submitted to the Principal Examiner for approval before the study is embarked on.

Economics

Economics is a social science that studies the distribution of resources in the production and consumption of goods and services in economic systems. It studies how economic entities like consumers, producers and the government interact and make economic decisions. It is generally classified into two areas – Microeconomics and Macroeconomics. Microeconomics studies the workings of the economy in a micro level while Macroeconomics studies the workings of the economy as a whole.

The A level Economics is offered at H1 (8819) and H2 (9732) level. Both will study the workings of the price mechanism and its failures in allocating resources in microeconomics; the macroeconomic objectives & policies, and international economy in macroeconomics. The depth and coverage of H2 Economics is deeper and wider than H1.

Some interesting issues that will be explored in A level Economics include, how does the price mechanism allocate resources efficiently; does the price mechanism regulate pollution efficiently and effectively; how much competition among firms is beneficial to the society; how can countries achieve low inflation rate, high economic growth rate, low unemployment rate & healthy balance of payment; and whether Singapore stands to gain in engaging in international trade.

Ability to write essays, to read, understand and use information in tables, graphs, diagrams, economics extracts and a keen interest in current affairs are essential for the course.

CJC offers Economics at H1, H2 and H3 (MOE ULCES H3, H3 SMU-MOE Games Theory and MOE-NUS HSSR) level.

For more information on the themes and topics covered, refer to SEAB website.

H1 Project Work (8809)

Project Work (PW) is a compulsory subject for all students and it is only offered at the H1 level. It provides opportunity for students to work together in a group on a task that require them to synthesise knowledge from various areas of learning, and critically and creatively apply it to real life situations. This process, which enhances students’ knowledge and enables them to acquire skills, prepares them for lifelong learning and the challenges ahead.
Students are required to complete three compulsory components:

  1. Written Report: At the end of the project, each group is required to submit a piece of written work based on the task that they have completed. This component assesses students on their performance pertaining to knowledge application and written communication.
  2. Oral Presentation: Each student from the group is given an opportunity to present a part of the project orally to a target audience and answer questions posed to the individual student. This component assesses students on their ability to be clear and coherent in presenting his ideas and to address and engage an audience. A group mark is given to recognize the group’s ability to be organized and coherent throughout the oral presentation.
  3. Group Project File: In this component, students will be assessed on their abilities to generate and develop ideas, and analyse and evaluate information that they have gathered. Students are expected to show evidence of these processes through the following individual submissions: Preliminary Ideas, Evaluation of Relevant Print/Non-print Material and Insights and Reflections.

Mathematics

There are 3 mathematics syllabuses, one each at Higher 1 (H1), Higher 2 (H2) and Higher 3 (H3) levels.

H1 Mathematics provides a foundation in mathematics for students who intend to enrol in university courses such as business, economics and social sciences. It covers Functions and Graphs, Calculus, and Probability and Statistics.

H2 Mathematics prepares students for university courses requiring more mathematics content, such as mathematics, physics and engineering. Topics covered include Functions and Graphs, Sequences and Series, Vectors, Complex Numbers, Calculus, Permutations and Combinations, and Probability and Statistics.

H3 Mathematics offers students who have a strong aptitude for and are passionate about mathematics an opportunity to further develop their mathematical modelling and reasoning skills. The topics included are Graph Theory, Combinatorics, and Differential Equations. Students are required to study all 3 topics. Students may also pursue H3 Mathematics programs offered by NUS or NTU.

Pre-requisites:
The prerequisite for offering H1 Mathematics is a pass in ‘O’ Level Mathematics. The prerequisite for offering H2 Mathematics is a pass in ‘O’ Level Additional Mathematics. H3 Mathematics is to be studied together with H2 Mathematics. Students are selected for H3 at the end of the JC1, based on performance throughout the year and in the end-of-year examinations.

Assessment:
The assessment for H1 Mathematics is a 3-hour paper marked out of 95 marks, comprising about 35 marks on Pure Mathematics and 60 marks on Statistics.

The assessment for H2 Mathematics is two 3-hour papers of equal weighting. Paper 1 consists of Pure Mathematics questions, while Paper 2 comprises 40% Pure Mathematics and 60% Statistics.

The assessment for H3 Mathematics is a 3-hour paper marked out of 96 marks, comprising 40 marks on Differential Equations and 56 marks from Combinatorics and Graph Theory. Another 4 marks is assigned for style and clarity of presentation in the whole paper.

The use of Graphic Calculator, without computer algebra system is expected. All examination papers will be set with the assumption that candidates will have access to a Graphic Calculator.

History

H2 History is a contemporary study of regional and international developments in the twentieth century. Students will offer TWO papers, which would enable them to appreciate the key political and economic developments in Southeast Asia and the rest of the world. Do you have a keen and curious mind? Would you like to experience the craft of a historian first hand? If so, you may want to consider H2 History.

Paper 1 : International History, 1945-2000 (9731/01)
There is one compulsory source based study on the United Nations and Global Affairs and students are required to attempt three essays based on the following themes:
Theme 1 : The Cold War and How it shaped the World.
Theme II : The Development of the Global Economy.
Theme III : Conflict and Cooperation.

Paper 2 : History of Southeast Asia c 1900-1997 (9731/02)

There is one compulsory source based study on ASEAN (1967-1997) and students are required to attempt three essays based on the following themes:
Theme I : How Independence was achieved
Theme II : Challenges to Independent Southeast Asian States
Theme III : Regional Conflicts and Cooperation.

H1 History (8814/01) is a contemporary study of international developments in the twentieth century. Students will offer ONE paper (Paper 1 –see above), which would enable them to appreciate the key political and economic developments in the world. If you have a curious and analytical mind, and wish to participate in a rigorous programme of intellectual investigation into historical issues, H1 history is for you.

H3 History
H3 History mainly takes the form of a research paper. It provides opportunities for students who display an exceptional ability and interest in the subject to explore historical events and issues in greater depth and develop skills of critical inquiry. Students are selected for H3 at the end of the JC1, based on performance throughout the year and end of year results.

Geography (8812 & 9730)

H2 Geography is examined along thematic lines, in two papers. Paper 1 examines Physical Geography, while Paper 2 looks at Human Geography. There are a total of three examinable topics per paper, all of which are compulsory. Geographical skills and techniques relevant to these topics will be covered as well. Other skills which will be taught are the ability to use other forms of geographical information. These include topographic maps and other maps like sketch maps, geology maps, data representation, satellite images, photographs, graphs, statistics and fieldwork techniques.

Geography at H2 Level (9730):

All candidates offering Geography at H2 level will sit for two written examinations (Paper 1 - Physical Geography, Paper 2 - Human Geography)
Paper 1:

  1. Core Topic for Physical Geography: Lithospheric Processes, Hazards and Management
  2. Core Topic for Physical Geography: Hydrologic Processes, Hazards and Management
  3. Core Topic for Physical Geography: Atmospheric Processes, Hazards and Management

Paper 2:

  1. Core Topic for Human Component: Globalisation of Economic Activities
  2. Core Topic for Human Component: Urban Issues and Challenges
  3. Core Topic for Human Component: Population Issues and Challenges

Geography at H1 Level (8812):

All candidates offering Geography at H1 level will sit for one written examination.
Core Topic for Physical Component: Lithospheric Processes, Hazards and Management
Core Topic for Human Component: Globalisation of Economic Activities
Selected Topic for CJC: Physical Geography - Hydrologic Processes, Hazards and Management

H3 Geography (9860):

The H3 Geography course targets candidates who have exceptional interest and ability in the subject. It assumes that candidates have knowledge and understanding of Geography at H2 level, and is pitched at a higher level. It builds on the knowledge; understanding and competencies acquired in H2 Geography and requires candidates to demonstrate greater depth of understanding. Learning through independent enquiry and adopting a critical stance in knowledge acquisition is emphasized. The subject has two components, ‘Geography Explored’ and ‘Geography Enquiry’. It is assessed as a Research Essay.

Physics (9246)

H2 PHYSICS (Syllabus 9745)

The study of H2 Physics stretches one to think critically and analytically. It builds upon the foundation of O Level Physics. Hence, good conceptual understanding for O Level Physics will be essential. It helps one to appreciate the world in which one lives in as it explores the workings of everyday phenomena, e.g. How is it possible for a cat to survive a 9 storey fall?; What caused the destruction of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge?; What is the speed I need to drive at if I were a Formula One driver when I turn a bend?; etc. Topics to be covered in H2 Physics include Newtonian Mechanics, Thermal Physics, Waves, Electricity and Magnetism.

H1 PHYSICS (Syllabus 8866)

The key difference between H1 and H2 Physics is in the content (fewer topics are covered for H1 Physics) and the lack of a practical assessment. It is essential to note that the depth of content coverage and the rigour is similar (same level of difficulty). Students are still required to develop good conceptual understanding of topics and apply critical and analytical thinking skills.

ESSENTIALS OF MODERN PHYSICS (H3 PHYSICS) (Syllabus 9811)

H3 Physics looks into the study of mainly modern Physics. Topics to be covered include Relativity; Quantum Theory of Light; Matter Waves, Quantum Mechanics, Solid-State Physics and Photonics. It requires a deep interest in Physics as well as strong analytical thinking skills in order to better appreciate the theories and concepts in these topics. Students need to perform consistently well in the subject if they like to be considered for H3 Physics.

CHEMISTRY

H1 CHEMISTRY (Syllabus 8872)

H1 Chemistry is distilled from the H2 Chemistry syllabus and designed as a contrasting subject for foundational study to provide students with a sufficient understanding of the subject rather than just for appreciation. The syllabus places great emphasis on the understanding and application of scientific concepts and principles that promotes critical thinking. H1 Chemistry covers fewer topics but at the same depth and rigour as the H2 counterpart. Candidates offering H1 Chemistry should preferably have an interest and aptitude for the subject. The syllabus is divided into Physical Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry and Organic Chemistry and include topics such as Atomic Structure; Chemical Bonding; Atoms, Molecules and Stoichiometry; Redox Reactions; Reaction Kinetics; Chemcial Periodicity; Hydrocarbons, Halogen Derivatives and Carboxylic Acids and Derivatives, etc

H2 CHEMISTRY (Syllabus 9746)

H2 Chemistry entails developing skills relevant to the increasingly technological world. Hence less emphasis is placed on factual recall. Rather, there is greater focus on understanding and application of scientific concepts and principles. The contents to be covered in H2 Chemistry require foundation of ‘O’ level Chemistry and build upon them. Hence, students should preferably have good background in ‘O’ level Pure Chemistry and Mathematics. Students considering a science course in the university should take Chemistry at H2 level as most science courses in the universities have H2 Chemistry as a pre-requisite.

The syllabus is also divided into Physical Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry and Organic Chemistry and include topics such as Atomic Structure; Chemical Bonding; Atoms, Molecules and Stoichiometry; Redox Reactions; Reaction Kinetics; Chemical Energetics; Electrochemistry; Chemical Periodicity; Group II and Group VII; Transition Elements; Hydrocarbons, Halogen Derivatives and Carboxylic Acids and Derivatives, Nitrogen compounds, etc

CHEMISTRY HIGHER 3 (Syllabus 9812)

The H3 Chemistry aims to provide students who have exceptional ability and interest in Chemistry the opportunity to:

  • apply the principles of Chemistry for an understanding of drug action and design
  • understand and apply various analytical techniques to chemical analysis
  • be enthused to engage in research and rationalize ethical issues

The syllabus is designed to provide opportunities for self-directed independent learning and is pitched at approximately undergraduate year one level.

Students who have performed well in all subjects at JC1 and have an interest to pursue Chemistry at an even higher level may consider offering H3 Chemistry in JC2. Topics covered include Properties of Functional Groups and Intermolecular Interactions; Molecular Stereochemistry; Reaction Mechanisms and Separation and Analytical Techniques

Biology

BIOLOGY HIGHER 2 (Syllabus 9747)

The H2 Biology and the ‘O’ level Biology syllabuses are designed to be seamless without the need for topics covered at the ‘O’ level’ to be revisited at the ‘A’ level. The ‘O’ level syllabus would thus be foundational and necessary to provide the background for the study at the ‘A’ level. The H2 syllabus has also moved away from the syllabus model that was based on a survey of topics to one that relates information on the cellular and molecular level to the systems level.

From long before Mendel, to years after Crick, our knowledge of Biology has increased tremendously. Topics covered in H2 Biology include Cellular functions; DNA and Genomics; Genetics of Viruses and Bacteria; Organisation and Control of Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Genomes; Genetic Basis for Variation and Development; Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry; Diversity and Evolution and Applications of Molecular and Cell Biology, etc, which can provide explanations and answers to some of the following questions:

  • Why do we need membranes in our cells?
  • What’s all the fuss about genetic engineering?
  • How can you make and use a protein fingerprint?
  • Why is it so crucial that, in unwinding and copying our DNA, we produce genetically identical cells?
  • What causes cancer?
  • Are viruses alive?
  • If a man has alkaptonuria (a rare, not-so-serious disease that turns their ear wax and urine reddish or an inky black), will his children suffer the same fate?

Students intending to offer H2 Biology should be prepared for a challenging and highly demanding subject and preferably have a good command of the English language. They would be assumed to have good knowledge and understanding of Biology at ‘O’ level.

BIOLOGY HIGHER 1 (Syllabus 8875)

The H1 Biology is distilled from the H2 Biology syllabus and designed as a contrasting subject for foundational study to provide students with a sufficient understanding of the subject rather than just for appreciation. The H1 Biology syllabus is slightly more than half the content load of the H2 Biology syllabus, while maintaining the same rigour. Students intending to offer H1 Biology should have a good command of the English language. These students would be assumed to have knowledge and understanding of Biology at ‘O’ level, as a single subject (i.e. pure Biology) or as part of a balanced science course (i.e. Science (Bio/Chem) or Science (Bio/Phy)).

PROTEOMICS HIGHER 3 (Syllabus 9815)

The H3 Biology aims to integrate knowledge in Biology and Chemistry through the study of Proteomics, thus requiring a firm grounding in H2 Biology and H2 Chemistry. Proteomics is a varied and multi-disciplinary topic and thus candidates would be exposed to a broad range of associated sub-topics. The content to be covered is expected to be at a higher level and at greater depth than an H2 subject. Students will have the opportunity to study examples of particular interest to them and to pursue independent study. Topics covered include Cell Biology; Chemical Equilibria; Chemical Kinetics; Enzyme Kinetics; Chemistry of Ligand Interactions and Protein Chemistry

Besides a good command of the English language, students intending to offer H3 Biology must also have offered H2 Biology and H2 Chemistry in their course of study and have done well in these subjects in their JC1.

Mother-Tongue Subjects

MOTHER TONGUE SUBJECTS

All students will need to meet minimum threshold grade of S (subpass) in H1 MTL or D7 in ‘O’ level Higher Mother Tongue Languages or a pass in H1 MTL ‘B’ for university admission.

Students offering an approved H1 Foreign Language/Asian Language/ Non-Tamil Indian Language in lieu of MTLs will have to register their FL/MTL in lieu’ in their own language centre (eg. MOELC).

H1 MTL: H1CL ( 8633 ) /H1ML ( 8635 ) / H1TL ( 8637 )
Prerequisites: Students obtained a D7 or better for CL/ML/TL or a E8 or below for HCL/HML/HTL in the GCE ‘O’ examination must offer H1CL/ML/TL and sit for H1MTL examination in JC1.

H1 General Studies in Chinese ( 8642) H1华文理解与写作 (H1GSC)
本试卷主要是考查学生的普通知识,思想成熟程度,对时事的认识,以及阅读、分析、讨论和文字表达的能力。本科仅供”O’水准高级华文至少C6的理科同学(Science students)选修。

H2 Chinese Language & Literature ( 9556 ) 华文与文学
选修条件:本科只供”O’水准高级华文至少B3,并且有兴趣提升华文水平的同学选修。

H1 MTL ‘B’: CLB (8281) / MLB (8381) / TLB ( 8481)
Prerequisites: Students already offered CLB/MLB/TLB in their secondary schools may offer CLB/MLB/TLB in JC.

Physical Education

Philosophy To enable each student to become a better and more integrated person through programmes that promote and foster self-reliance, physical fitness, love for physical activities, and a spirit of cooperation, compassion, along with a willingness to be of service.

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